USA Hammer Throwing Needs a USA Approach [Part 1]

  • Kibwe will post some thoughts on the topic on HMMR Media tomorrow, so check it out.


    Just a couple more quick thoughts from my side. I think John and I agree on 90% of things here. But our main difference is that what I think works well to develop a thrower over 5 years is the same as what will develop them over 10-15 years. It seems John would take a different approach with those two types of athletes.


    Regarding strength: it definitely helps more with women and that's why we've had more international success there. On the guys side strength alone will not develop a 75m thrower by the end of college. Look at the guys who have come close lately (Conor, Henning, Dunkleberger, Cory Martin, or even back to Kevin McMahon and Dave Popejoy) and they all began throwing earlier. You either need to be very talented or stick with it a while. I agree with John that getting to 70m/75m before the end of college is a great goal, but you shouldn't sacrifice long-term development to get there 6 months faster since it is not like there is a payday or sponsorship waiting there. Those that succeed will have to be doing it for the love of the sport and dedicated to it for more than 4-5 years.

  • I agree with John that getting to 70m/75m before the end of college is a great goal, but you shouldn't sacrifice long-term development to get there 6 months faster since it is not like there is a payday or sponsorship waiting there. Those that succeed will have to be doing it for the love of the sport and dedicated to it for more than 4-5 years.


    Is it a 6 month window?

  • For what I've read and heard @John Smith 's creativity is in how he takes a bit of Bonderchuk and wedges into the NCAA system as best he can. Like it or not the States offers a 4-5 year window for a hammer thrower to make sense of a throwing career.


    From my folding chair it looks like the deal-breaker as to whether someone staying in the game or not is community (family and friends) support; not financial issues.

  • As series of ideas addressing hammer throwing in the United States: <social.throwholics discussion> by You All USA Hammer Throwing Needs a USA Approach [Part 1] by John Smith March 20th, 2014 The American Way March 24, 2014/ by Martin Bingisser USA Hammer Throwing Needs a USA Approach [Part 2] by John Smith March 25th, 2014 For […]

  • I have been a high school hammer coach for a while now and noticed your comment about our “politically correct” school systems. I think you missed the most difficult part about throwing the hammer in high school. Most schools have just a couple of coaches that try and coach Shot, Discus, and Javelin. Now have them coach the hammer that most have never coached and get this all in a 2 hour practice. Pretty difficult to do, let alone the Bondarchuk method which is time consuming. What has worked for me is to get the implement in the kids hands as sone as possible, stick to very basic techniques, get them excited so they take it upon themselves to learn how to throw. I like how the event is not a state sanctioned event because it allows me to kids out of season. We also throw the weight being careful not to give-up on technique which gives us a fairly long season including a USATF season.


  • Hi : I’m Rick ,I’m no longer young[69] . I took a clinic the other day with Suzy Powell I found out I wasn’t much good at anything but pretty decent at the hammer throw. I’m interested in some coaching to prepare for senior game events. If you know of some links please let me know. I’m in northern California but will travel a bit. Thanks ,Rick



    I have been a high school hammer coach for a while now and noticed your comment about our “politically correct” school systems. I think you missed the most difficult part about throwing the hammer in high school. Most schools have just a couple of coaches that try and coach Shot, Discus, and Javelin. Now have them coach the hammer that most have never coached and get this all in a 2 hour practice. Pretty difficult to do, let alone the Bondarchuk method which is time consuming. What has worked for me is to get the implement in the kids hands as sone as possible, stick to very basic techniques, get them excited so they take it upon themselves to learn how to throw. I like how the event is not a state sanctioned event because it allows me to kids out of season. We also throw the weight being careful not to give-up on technique which gives us a fairly long season including a USATF season.

  • I'm a big fan of the fact that by throwing implements we don't normally throw...I never competed w the 35lb weight, but occasionally used it as a training tool....they can teach us things about throwing other implements(the shot, in my case). But I'd NEVER train for 4 throws...and the Highland games are just crazy...some games will have 8-10 throwing events and you HAVE to complete all

  • Yep, the highland games are a fun and useful "off season" training tool. We sometime mess around with them in practice, just for fun. I've had several athletes that went on to compete in the games and still do, long after graduating. One of my former female athletes just placed 4th or 5th at the World Championships. I set up a training program for her, based off of what we do (ie periodization and over/under weight training), she ended up hitting 4 PRs (there are 7 events) at the competition. There's been quite a few top level athletes that compete in the games; Valerie Adams, Summer Pierson, Adriane Wilson, Brian Oldfield, Connie Price-Smith, Geoff Capes, Petur Guðmundsson, the list goes on...

  • I am a former hammer thrower that is trying to start a hammer throwing club in the Chicago area. I am looking for a hammer coach to teach kids from 14-22 the hammer and javelin throw. Can you think where I should look for such a coach. Any help would be appreciated.

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