"The Ring" archive entries from May 11th 2010

  • published at May 11th 2010 2:00am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from jucs

    I agree. You cannot push off your left unless you are leaning in some fashion. It cuts off rotational force of the right leg and stalls what could be advanced pivoting facilitated by the right leg. Try this. Get balanced on the left and all the weight with your upper body neutral and not leaning forward or backward. Now, try and push off the left. It's not possible. You'll just hop up in the air.

    published at May 11th 2010 2:23am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 3:01am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from Bloom

    I dropped my upper body because I found that it stopped me from dropping my left shoulder in the back of the ring and allowed me to stay more on my left and get a better sprint. The whole technique was built around using good left leg drive to get out of the back of the ring and land in a good balanced position in the middle. There is no doubt that my strength and explosiveness allowed me to get into that position and come out of it, but I spent a lot of time developing my sprint and would train in blocks and did a lot of running.

    published at May 11th 2010 3:34am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from Big Adam

    My technical model was given me by my uncle Brad Mears. He spent a lot of time studying biomechanical models in general and found that the longer the path the ball moves through the more force can be applied.
    When I turn out of the back I don't jump or push or anything like that. I simply step using the momentum of the leg sweep and pull my knee to my waist at the last moment. This puts my right foot dead center every time and allows my right foot to turn, then I use my left step through to the front to add speed and pin my upperbody back so that I can push on the ball as long as possible. It is a slow acceleration from front to back.

    Cheers

    Adam

    published at May 11th 2010 3:36am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from Bloom

    If you land dead center then I think you land short in the ring. The goal should be to land 8-10 inches past center so your base is tighter and allows for better leg drive. The left foot step through has been shown to be biomechanically inferior through the work done with the discus throwers. I believe it leads to a shifting of the weight toward the left side which reduces power and increases fouling.

    published at May 11th 2010 3:48am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from Big Adam

    I have to disagree with landing past center. Shorter bases lead to less balance and a greater chance of weight shift. Plus it is difficult to maintain a good knee bend with a short base. I think it would make u land too tall in order to explode into the shot. I am curious about the step through being inferior. How else would u plant your left at the front quickly other than a stepping into that position? A good example of the technical model that I most identify with is either Rutger Smith or Cory Martin. I really like Rutgers' technique a lot.

    Adam

    published at May 11th 2010 3:58am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 5:01am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 7:35am on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 12:11pm on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 1:46pm on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from tomsonite

    Reading through this whole discussion I saw a few comments about doing things out of the back to create a longer path for the ball to travel through, thereby increasing the time that force can be applied to the ball, leading to higher release velocities.
    In the spin though, isn't there a relatively long "zero support phase" though? There is a short amount of time where the thrower is not in contact with the ground at all...this breaks the "longer path" the ball is accelerated over because as has also been stated in this discussion, you can't apply any real force with one, or no feet on the ground!

    I always understood that the spin can lead to farther throws because it allows the thrower to land in a more closed, "wrapped-up" power position. So the longer path of the ball is really just in the second half of the throw.
    My question is, does it really matter what you do out of the back, as long as you land in a good wrapped-up, balanced power position? Or does one method out of the back lead to more momentum in the PP than another?

    published at May 11th 2010 2:25pm on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • Quote from jason

    in response to the little debate thats been going on here about the left leg drive and a powerful right leg sweep...

    i think they both have to be done, and if you ignore one, thats when you have a breakdown. if you only push off the left, what happens to your right? you're going to lose a lot of rotational power. a you might as well glide if its only linear. i always thought the point of the rotational shot is to gain power with a right leg sweep, at least i think thats what randy barnes did. if you only sweep the right and dont push off the left, what happens to your left? it floats behind you and you have 1 foot on the ground for too long. i was taught its a combination of the two. and the combination depends on the athlete. i can name 100 throwers who wouldnt have the success andy bloom had bent over like he was in the back of the circle. i would be willing to bet he wouldn't have thrown 70ft coming out of the back the way reese hoffa does(no offense mr bloom). i know thats a worn out argument, but it seems to be something that is missing here. its all relative to the athlete.

    published at May 11th 2010 3:07pm on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

  • published at May 11th 2010 3:24pm on http://www.effortlessthrow.org/

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